Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) prevalence is rapidly increasing on a global scale, and mortality rates in subjects living with diabetes remain increased compared to subjects without T2DM. New and better treatment options are essential for preventing diabetes development, improving glycemic control, reducing cardiovascular complications, and addressing individual patient needs.

Our Diabetes team is highly experienced in conducting clinical trials for T2DM and related indications, including Coronary Heart Disease, Dyslipidemia, and Kidney Disease. Get in touch to learn why we are the ideal partner to support you throughout your clinical development program.

Meet our scientific leaders for Type 2 Diabetes clinical trials

Prof. Dr. Manuel Castro Cabezas works as Chief Scientific Officer at Julius Clinical. He is also a senior consultant for endocrinology, internal medicine, and vascular diseases at the Franciscus Gasthuis Rotterdam and associate professor of medicine at Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Prof. Castro Cabezas has participated in international clinical trials in the fields of lipid management, diabetes and obesity and published over 200 papers in peer reviewed journals dealing with postprandial lipemia, diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, metabolic syndrome, familial combined hyperlipidemia, HIV lipodystrophy and free fatty acid metabolism.

Meet our scientific leaders for Type 2 Diabetes clinical trials

Prof. Dr. Diederick E. (Rick) Grobbee is Chief Scientific Officer at Julius Clinical, and a Professor of Clinical Epidemiology at the University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, the Netherlands. He is also a Distinguished University Professor of International Health Sciences and Global Health.

Type II Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for a range of severe complications, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and heart disease. Our scientific networks Cardio Clinical and NASH Clinical consist of many experienced investigators and clinicians with a special interest in these indications around the globe.

NASH Clinical

NASH Clinical is a worldwide network of healthcare clinicians, investigators and specialists dedicated to the study and treatment of Metabolic dysfunction-associated steatohepatitis (MASH, previously known as NASH). We foster a robust collaboration among participating clinicians, including Primary Care Physicians, Endocrinologists, Diabetologists, Hepatologists, and Gastroenterologists, and this collective expertise enables us to provide the best support for clinical trials within this field.

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Cardio Clinical

The Cardio Clinical network has built a solid foundation through longstanding collaborations with cardiologists from diverse hospitals, and offers a wealth of experienced sites and skilled investigators worldwide. Cardio Clinical has been involved in many large-scale randomized intervention trials, aimed at preventing and treating cardiovascular disease.

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Some highlighted studies for Type 2 Diabetes

 

 

Advance

Phase III, Global

11,000 Patients | >20 Countries

The effects of routine antihypertensive therapy and glucose control therapy in patients with type II diabetes.

Alecardio

Phase III, Global

4072 Patients | 19 Countries | 436 Sites

Treatment on Cardiovascular Mortality a Morbidity in Subjects with type 2 Diabetes who experienced a recent Acute Coronary Syndrome.


Our expert team for Type 2 Diabetes

Our expert team for Type II Diabetes combines the latest scientific insights with operational excellence to provide the best tailor-made solutions for your clinical trial.

Martin czakon
Rick grobbee
Manuel castro cabezas
Marco alings
Wiebe-Buitenwerf
Marcel bootsma
Elizabeth liano callahan

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